Posts tagged ‘calculator’

Using individual glyphs from a OpenType Font in LuaLaTeX

I am currently preparing a tutorial on the Texas Instruments BAII Plus Professional Calculator in LaTeX. TI provides the font for the different keystrokes as TTF and PFB/PFM which makes it way easier to typeset the symbols.

The first step was to convert the font to OTF format. I tried TTF 2 OTF first without luck as the resulting OTF did not have any symbols in it. Using PFB 2 OTF worked better, the generated OTF had supposedly all the keys in it.

In the next step I wanted to generate an LaTeX overview of all symbols. Using the information from https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/103704/how-to-properly-install-and-use-a-new-font-with-lualatex and https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/25249/how-do-i-use-a-particular-font-for-a-small-section-of-text-in-my-document/37251 I came up with the following (don’t forget to install the OTF before!):

\documentclass[11pt]{article}
 
\usepackage[left=1cm,right=1cm,landscape,a4paper]{geometry}
\usepackage{fontspec}
 
\newfontfamily\tifont{BA2Plus Symbols}
 
\usepackage{luacode}
\usepackage{longtable,array,xcolor,listings}
\begin{luacode*} 
function print_glyphs(maxCols,maxChars) 
  local id = font.current()         -- geht Font ID
  local fnt = font.getfont(id)
  local col = 1
  local maxU4 = 15*(16^3+16^2+16+1)
  a = {}
  for k, v in pairs(fnt.characters) do
    a [#a + 1] = k
  end
  table.sort(a)
  for i, k in ipairs(a) do
    if i >= maxChars then break end
    if col == 1 then
      if k > maxU4 then
        tex.sprint(string.format("U+%06x", k))
      else
        tex.sprint(string.format("U+%04x", k))
      end
      tex.sprint("&") 
    end
    if (i) then
      tex.sprint(string.format([[\char%i]], k))
    else
     tex.sprint("~")
    end
    if col == maxCols then              -- Line finished?
      tex.sprint([[\\\cline{2-]] .. maxCols+1 .. "} ")  -- Yes
      col = 1                           -- newline
    else
      tex.sprint("&")                   -- no, Print &
      col = col + 1                     -- next column
    end
  end
end
\end{luacode*}
 
 
\begin{document}
 
{\tifont
\begin{longtable}{>{\color{black!50}\ttfamily\footnotesize}r|
                  *{10}{>{\color{black}}p{5em}|}}
\cline{2-11}
\endhead
 
\directlua{print_glyphs(10,65463)} \\ \cline{2-11}
\end{longtable}}
 
\end{document}

PDF

The next step then was to create a logic of how to address the different symbols. Of course TSX was helpful again (https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/38402/how-to-pick-a-specific-symbol-from-a-specific-font):

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage[top=4cm,left=2cm,right=2cm,bottom=2cm]{geometry}
\newfontfamily\tifont{BA2Plus Symbols}
\newcommand\tif[1]{{\tifont\symbol{#1}}}
\usepackage{fonttable}
 
\begin{document}
\twocolumn
 
33  >  \tif{33}
 
34  >  \tif{34}
 
...
 
124  >  \tif{124}
 
125  >  \tif{125}
 
\end{document}

PDF

The next step is to come up with a convenient way of addressing the glyphs, e.g. by creating aliases for each glyph.

Uwe

Uwe Ziegenhagen mag LaTeX und Python, auch gern in Kombination. Hat Dir dieser Beitrag geholfen und möchtest Du Dich dafür bedanken? Dann unterstütze doch vielleicht die Dingfabrik Köln e.V. mit einem kleinen Beitrag. Details zur Bezahlung findest Du unter Spenden für die Dingfabrik.

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